Tag Archives: Rocking Dog Remember Me Project

The Remember Me Project, Closer To Home

Please Remember Me, Rocking Dog

Please Remember Me

Rocking Dog has been quietly working away on The Remember Me Project researching all the WW1 names on the Whiteshill Memorial, Hambrook. In between looking at museum archives, Ancestry, local history books and The Commonwealth War Graves Commission site I have also been out and about!

There have been graves to visit in three local churchyards. Real Live Rocking Dog has accompanied me on these trips and watched me lay six more poppy crosses.

All Saints Church, Winterbourne was my first port of call to visit two graves. The first I found easily, that of George Fitz Worlock. A Guardsman in the 1st Battalion Grenadier Guards he died on 19th November 1914 at Manchester Royal Infirmary from wounds he sustained at Ypres.

Between 1914-1918 520 beds at the Manchester Royal Infirmary were allocated to the War Office. Over 10,000 service personnel were treated during this period. Incidentally in 1918 a centre was opened at the hospital specifically to deal with Venereal Disease. The centre treated more than 837 people in the year it opened. I do not know how many of these were servicemen but Venereal Disease was a sizeable problem in troops serving abroad. In 1918 there were over 60,000 admissions for VD in France and Flanders but only 74,711 admissions of the well publicised Trench Foot for the entirety of the war in France and Flanders. Many soldiers risked the brothels knowing that a case of Syphilis or Gonorrhoea could excuse them from the front line.

Guardsman George Fitz Worlock (14198) was repatriated to England with his injuries and disembarked on 6th October 1914. He died little more than a month later on the 19th November 1914. He was buried in the churchyard not far from the place where he lived with his wife Lottie (nee Malpass). They had married in Bristol on 7th December 1913. It was poignant to see that Lottie shared the same grave plot and had remained a widow until she died in July 1971 at the age of 86. George had enlisted with the Grenadier Guards in January 1909. Prior to this he is listed as being a carter. As a professional soldier he would have been one of the first expected to fight for King and Country. I am presuming that a family dealing with a serviceman’s death on home soil could choose whether they wanted a Portland Stone Commonwealth war grave headstone or at their own expense a headstone of their choosing. The Worlock family chose an imposing Celtic style cross in local Pennant stone. When I laid my poppy there were drifts of cow parsley and a border planted with wallflowers, marigolds, and a silvery leaved curry plant. Mature holly trees, a cherry and other native trees provided nesting for sweet singing birds.

The other grave in this churchyard proved more difficult to find. I was helped to locate the grave by a really helpful church warden. On the top tier and far corner of the cemetery I found the grave of Eynon George Rice Bowen. A Captain in the Remounts he died on 26th March 1916  aged 52. Interestingly he does not appear on the Commonwealth Graves Commission site. Details of his death are fairly sketchy but I have recently stumbled upon an archive which will be useful in researching his life. Not only did he serve in the Great War but the Boer War too. The Army Remount Service was the body responsible for the purchase and training of horses and mules as remounts for the British Army. A large depot existed in Shirehampton, near Bristol which dealt with animals being shipped from overseas (predominantly USA and Canada)

In the Frenchay Parish magazine of March 1916 it states:- Alterations to Frenchay Roll of Honour. Captain Eynon GR Bowen whose serious illness we all deeply deplore, and for whom our prayers are asked, is of the Remounts not of the ASC (Army Service Corps). In April’s Parish Magazine Captain Eynon GR Bowen’s burial is reported. Just 5 months later his son Lieut. Eynon George Arthur Bowen is killed, shot down by German ace Oswald Boelcke (the flier who trained the Red Baron).

Father and son are both commemorated on the Whiteshill Memorial. Meanwhile Eynon Bowen senior is laid to rest at All Saints, Winterbourne Down and Eynon Bowen junior is commemorated on the Arras Flying Services Memorial, France. The grave in Winterbourne mentions Eynon Bowen junior and it is also the resting place of Georgina Catherine Bowen, the wife of Eynon George Rice who died on 15th December 1945 aged 82. Mrs Bowen was a very active member of the community serving on a number of wartime committees. Their daughter Dorothea was a member of the Voluntary Aid Detachment and provided nursing care at Cleve Hill Hospital.

Eynon GR Bowen’s grave sits in a beautiful spot with far reaching views to Bristol, and over less distant fields to the family home “Harcombes”, Hambrook. When I came to lay my poppy there was wild lilac, bluebells, buttercups and a leafy canopy. Only the sound of birdsong broke the silence of this beautiful pastoral setting.

One grave needed to be visited in St Peter’s Churchyard, Frampton Cotterell. Gunner John Stuart Rymer (120959) served with the Royal Garrison Artillery and actually died a long time after WW1 had ended  (3rd October 1921). His inclusion on the memorial is a little bit of an anomaly. The War Graves Commission only commemorate those who have died during the designated war years whilst in Commonwealth military service or of causes attributable to service. Death in service included not only those killed in combat but other causes such as those who died in training accidents, air raids and due to disease such as the 1918 flu pandemic. In the case of WW1 the period of consideration was 4th August 1914 to 31st August 1921. Gunner Rymer’s death fell outside this criteria. He does not feature on the Commonwealth Graves Commission site.

In the Parish magazine of October 1921 it states that John Rymer died for his country as a result of wounds received during the Great War.

A pupil of Bristol Grammar School between 1907-1912 there is a little film on the Schools site about a visit to John Rymer’s grave. He is to be found in the churchyard in a grouping of three almost identical crosses. One is a grave for John, another for his brother Arthur (who died aged 30 in 1930) and the third cross is for their mother Emily who died in 1906. According to records their father John who died in 1928 is also buried in the plot. One mystery is as to where John’s second wife is buried (he married Emily’s sister Kate)

The local circuit was completed with a visit to St John The Baptist Church in Frenchay. I know this church well, it was where I was christened, confirmed  and married. Added to which there were numerous nativities, harvest festivals, plays at the church that both myself and …..much later our children took part in. I was here to visit three graves in the churchyard.

Private Frank George Amos (204205) served with the 7th Worcesters Reserve Battalion (transferred to 526th Area Employment Company, Labour Corps). He died on December 17th 1918 aged 29yrs. He was the son of Albert (d. 1915) and Emily (d.1919) who ran The Crown public house in Hambrook. It is unclear why Frank and his brother Frederick are commemorated on the Winterbourne Down panel of the Whiteshill memorial and yet the Amos family burials are at Frenchay. The Amos brothers are also named on the war memorial at All Saints Church Winterbourne Down. Franks brother Frederick was killed in action in 1917 aged 21 and we visited his grave at Faubourg D’amiens Cemetery, Arras last year.

Franks resting place is to be found in a shady spot in the churchyard with drifts of cow parsley, brambles, baby blue eyes and a canopy of mature trees. Frank lies in the plot with his mother and father. Meanwhile his brother Frederick is also commemorated on the grave.

A Portland stone Commonwealth grave was found in a different part of the graveyard. This grave belongs to Driver Arthur George Criddle (18245) who served with the Royal Field Artillery (A Bty 109th Brigade). Arthur died at home on 28th August 1917 (though there are some discrepancies with the date of death) aged 23 years. In November 1915 the Frenchay parish magazine reports that Arthur is in hospital, and in September 1916 he has been discharged and given an Army pension. He died after a very long illness  and many people attended his funeral on 2nd September 1917. One of a large family, another of the Criddle brothers (William Ewart) died in February 1917 in Mesopotamia (now Iraq)

Finally there was the grave of a Royal Flying Corps officer to find. With views over Frenchay Common Captain Harry Wadlow’s grave enjoys a lovely spot. Harry was accidentally killed on May 1st 1917 whilst flying near Dartford, Kent. A past pupil of Bristol Grammar School he was a brilliant sportsman. He joined the Army Service Corps after leaving school in 1914 and in September 1916 the Frenchay parish magazine reported that Harry had transferred to the Royal Flying Corps. He began a course of flying instruction in a de Havilland DH2. These aircraft were constructed of wood, fabric and wire, it had a maximum speed of 86mph and was fitted with a machine gun.

Harry was an only child, his mother Laura had died when he was six. His father, Henry Wadlow was headmaster at Frenchay School. The school was closed on the day of Harry’s funeral (May 7th) so that the children could attend and he was buried with full military honours. Harry was laid to rest in the same plot as his mother.

So, this completes the poppy laying for The Remember Me Project in England. 44 graves/memorials of the 53 inscribed names have now been visited. Wales is my next port of call to visit the grave of a miner who left the valleys for the front.

One Of Brothers,Rocking Dog

One Of Brothers

Commonwealth Grave,Rocking Dog

Commonwealth Grave

An Amos Brother,Rocking Dog

An Amos Brother

Poppy For Harry,Rocking Dog

Poppy For Harry

Common Views,Rocking Dog

Common Views

Worlock Grave,Rocking Dog

Worlock Grave

1921 Casualty,Rocking Dog

1921 Casualty

Mother & Sons,Rocking Dog

Mother & Sons

Home View,Rocking Dog

Home View

Snow, Cake, Siena & Unexpected DNA!

Gilded Siena,Rocking Dog

Gilded Siena

Sorry it’s been so long since Rocking Dog signed on. A week of coughing and the lack of sleep that came with that didn’t really make me feel much like talking either verbally or in the form of written words. At one point I looked across at Real Live Rocking Dog and thought “boy, your breathing’s a bit laboured” however after a while I realised it was indeed me that was the one breathing heavily!

Before Cough (BC) Andyman together with youngest daughter headed out to Umbria for a very cheeky little break. Though cold, the valley was embellished with the dazzling spectacle that is Mimosa. Birds were busily enjoying the olives that had escaped the olive oil bottle and the countryside as ever looked verdantly beautiful. The following morning Liv’ and I planned to head to Rome. We awoke to snow and the hills looked as if they had been magically dusted with icing sugar. It really was quite surreal seeing olive trees with a cloak of snow, especially with robins in residence!

Alas our train to Rome was cancelled so we decided to take the next available bus or train to destination unknown. We ended up on a bus heading to the beautiful city of Siena. The warm bus wiggled through snow covered medieval hilltop towns and past vineyards, ploughed fields and olive groves. In just over an hour we arrived at the bottom of the city. In years gone by these Italian hilltop towns would have needed an arduous and lengthy walk to reach their summits. Recently most cities have become inventive with their transport plans and there are lifts, escalators, funiculars and the like. On this occasion we used a series of steep escalators to reach the architectural delights of Siena. We had a really gorgeous time simply wandering. The Palio where the famous bareback horse races takes place annually (July 2nd and Aug 16th 2018) was joyfully devoid of the throb of summer tourists. If you are in Siena at any point the Complex of Santa Maria della Scala is worth a visit. It houses several museums and is the site of one of Europe’s first hospitals. The frescoes were wonderful and I loved the thought that patients had such amazing art to gaze at from their beds.  I particularly loved the starry ceiling in the First Aid Room.

Cake, delicious wine, pasta, wood fired pizza and friendly folk made this whistle-stop trip to Umbria and Tuscany very pleasurable.

After Cough (AC)- it’s been difficult trying to shake off this irritable ailment. Real Live Rocking Dog has not been loving the snow so like me has been enjoying curling up beside the wood-burner. Trying to do something slightly constructive I baked a cake using new season Rhubarb from the garden, delicious! There have been bathroom planning decisions to be made, and cupboards to de-hoard. I have been contemplating cutting the fabric for my new summer coat… maybe this week. Pattern matching, I can’t decide whether it’s a pleasurable challenge or acutely sadistically stressful!

There have also been soldiers to research ready for our return to the Commonwealth War Cemeteries in France later this month. This week there will be poppy crosses to collect and route planning to organise. Eighteen soldiers graves/memorials will be visited in fifteen different cemeteries over the course of two days. Our travels will take us to Dieppe and Rouen before heading up to a cluster of cemeteries on the Somme. There is a solitary cemetery to visit just East of Paris where we will pay our respects to a soldier whose family lived in a house where really good friends of ours now live. On our route home we will head to the Menin Gate Memorial at Ypres where we will lay our last poppy cross in France. Together with the cemeteries we are hoping to visit some manmade caves under a church at Bouzincourt. During a Time Team episode in 2010 some WW1 graffiti was discovered. One name belongs to a soldier, Alfred Flux who lived in our village. Alfred wrote his name and details onto into the stone in 1916. Serving with the Royal Field Artillery he was to later die in March 1918. Having no known grave he is commemorated at Pozieres. On our return home there will be the lengthy job of collating all the information and archiving photographs.

Now for the DNA news. As you may already know my girls thoughtfully bought me an Ancestry DNA kit for Christmas. In January I sent off my phial of spit and waited patiently. I received an e.mail whilst in the supermarket on Wednesday telling me my results were in. Mother in Law promptly posted home with her bags of cakes, drive home done, bags dropped on the kitchen table, computer turned on…let the show begin!  The results were given in the form of a wheel of cheese and imagine my surprise that the largest percentage of my DNA is Scandinavian! Not a whiff of the French Huegenots that I expected. Roughly a quarter of the cheese wheel was Northern English and another quarter paid homage to my Celtic roots (Irish/Welsh Scottish). I always suspected I had red and white gingham running through my veins! The only slightly sad bit of this is that because my Mum and Dad are both dead I can’t ascertain easily who was the Viking in the family. Was it my Dad who was Scottish or my Mums long line Yorkshire family? Anyway I am loving being Scandi’ and there’s even an 8% wedge of Iberian Peninsula in there for good measure!

Anyway I must away now I have got to put the Elk Casserole on and get fitted for my Scandinavian traditional costume!

Have a great week and I hope the big thaw is well underway wherever you are. Stay cosy!

Liz aka Rocking Dog x

Before The Snow,Rocking Dog

Before The Snow

First Aid Room,Rocking Dog

First Aid Room

Coffee & Cake,Rocking Dog

Coffee & Cake

Snow & Metal,Rocking Dog

Snow & Metal

Snow Patrol,Rocking Dog

Snow Patrol

Monochrome Morning,Rocking Dog

Monochrome Morning

Stockholm,Rocking Dog

Stockholm

Penchant For Gingham!, Rocking Dog

Penchant For Gingham!

Scandi' Inspired Creativity,Rocking Dog

Scandi’ Inspired Creativity

Bake A Cake,Rocking Dog

Bake A Cake

Sew A New Coat,Rocking Dog

Sew A New Coat

Next Trip,Rocking Dog

Next Trip

The Olives Are Picked & Rocking Dog Is Back At The Kennel!

Before They Became Oil,Rocking Dog

Before They Became Oil

Yes indeed the olives are now picked and made into divine olive oil.The nets have been put away for another year and the 1,300 mile journey back to the kennel from Umbria has been completed.The linen has been traded in for woolly jumpers and the wood-burner has been stoked. Brrrrrrrr!

It’s good to be back with fresh verve and inspiration and I look forward to seeing friends for walking, chatting and simply being with. Watch out for new Rocking Dog posts including my trip to fifteen French and Belgian cemeteries over 2 days for the Rocking Dog “Remember Me Project” It was the most incredible and poignant experience.

DATES FOR YOUR DIARY– Rocking Dog will be selling Christmas Loveliness together with other wonderful crafty and artisanal foodie folk at the seriously fandabidosi (my Italian is really improving!) Court House Farm, Portishead on Sunday 26th November and Sunday 10th December 10-3.30.

It’s now time to shut myself away like a little elf in my workroom and create some creative and very festive magic!

Love to all, and hope you have a good week. A wine fasting Rocking Dog x