Tag Archives: College Green Bristol

Celebrating 100 Years Of Women Being Able To Vote

Celebrate The Vote For Women,Rocking Dog

Celebrate The Vote For Women

Yesterday marked the day when exactly a century ago SOME women were given the right to vote. The Representation of People Act gave the right for women over the age of thirty who owned land to vote. Additionally if a woman was married to a man who owned property she too could vote. The Act also saw the voting age of men dropped from 30 to 21 years (19 years for service personnel). It would take another decade for the Equal Franchise Act (1928) to give women the same voting rights as men.

Last night on a slight whim I picked up my keys and rushed into central Bristol to join a Lantern Parade celebrating a century of the start of women being allowed to vote. Understanding a little of the struggle of the Suffragists (peaceful campaigners) and Suffragettes (more militant campaigners) I have always robustly encouraged my children to use their vote, especially for women it’s been so hard fought for.

It was good to stand by side people celebrating this landmark date but at the same time appreciating it was only the privileged few on 6th February 1918 who were actually eligible vote. Bristol had one of the highest levels of suffrage action outside London and so it seemed only natural for the city to commemorate the date somewhat flamboyantly. During the research of “my” Memorial soldiers I came across articles relating to an arson attack on a house more than likely firebombed by a suffragette.

In excess of 1,000 people took part in the lantern parade. Most lanterns were made of white paper bags and utilised a phone with attached selfie stick to illuminate them. So simple and yet so effective. Most lanterns carried thought provoking messages, personal favourites were Vote Wisely, Equality Street, Women Give Birth To All voters, Here For Nan. One or two lanterns were extreme and caused consternation. A lantern with the wording “Skin Men” was regarded by many as plain cruel and unnecessary.

We headed past landmark buildings which had been lit in Suffragette colours for the occasion. The Wills Memorial Building looked particularly spectacular. The parade ended on College Green with a choir of 100 voices. It was bitterly cold with sleet, snow and rain to contend with, but I am pleased that I took part in this event, I certainly won’t be around for the 150th celebration!

Light The Sky, Rocking Dog

Light The Sky

Suffragette Colours,Rocking Dog

Suffragette Colours

Plain Message,Rocking Dog

Plain Message

Paper Bag Gratitude,Rocking Dog

Paper Bag Gratitude

Dressed For The Occasion,Rocking Dog

Dressed For The Occasion

Absolutely, Rocking Dog

Absolutely

The 11th Hour Of The 11th Day Of The 11th Month

Poignant Somme Symbolism, Rocking Dog

Poignant Somme Symbolism

Armistice Day has been commemorated for the last 98 years on the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month. It marks the day when the Armistice was signed at Compiegne, France between the allies of WW1 and Germany. It brought about the cessation of hostilities on the Western Front.

Beginning in 1939 the two minute silence was moved to the closest Sunday to 11th November. This decision was taken so as not to disrupt wartime munition production if 11th November fell on a weekday. After WW2 this Sunday was named Remembrance Day or Remembrance Sunday.

The Poppy worn in the lead up to, and on Remembrance Sunday itself came about as a result of the famous poem “In Flanders Fields” by Lt. Colonel John McCrae. A Canadian doctor, he was inspired to write the poem in 1915 after losing a friend at Ypres. The bleak battle torn ground was barren, but he witnessed resilient scarlet poppies struggling through the churned and barbed fields. Later an American academic Moina Michael, started making silk poppies which were brought over to England by a French woman Anna Guerin. In 1921 the British Legion was founded, and the organisation that year ordered 9 million poppies. The sale of these poppies raised a staggering £106,000, helping veterans with housing and employment.

Yesterday I went to College Green in Bristol to see the installation of “Shrouds of the Somme”. I witnessed servicemen meticulously laying out 19,240 12inch shrouded figures. The number represents the allied servicemen who died on the very first day of the Battle of the Somme. Somerset artist Rob Heard made the figures and personally wrapped and bound each figure with a hand stitched shroud. Studying a list from the Commonwealth War Graves Commission he systematically worked through the 19,240 fatalities, crossing off each name as a figurine had been given its shroud. Though I didn’t witness the exhibit in its entirety, it was truly poignant. The “Shrouds of the Somme” remains in Bristol until the 18th November.

Driving away from College Green I happened to notice that poor old Queen Victoria sited outside The Bristol Royal Marriot Hotel had been given a rubber gas mask by some joker. From experience she’s the butt of many a prank, for a student city we are!!

Today I will be remembering my grandfather John Warrington Scott (Royal Engineers) who was badly gassed in the trenches during WW1. As a consequence of the gas he died from stomach cancer aged 46 on Armistice Day 1941. Also remembering my lovely mum who died 31 years ago today. On a happier note Happy Birthday to lovely niece Iona who slipped out into the world on the bathroom floor 17 years ago today!

Shrouds Of The Somme, Rocking Dog

Shrouds Of The Somme

3 Of The 19,240, Rocking Dog

3 Of The 19,240

Gas Masked Royal, Rocking Dog

Gas Masked Royal

Grandfather John W. Scott, Rocking Dog

Grandfather John W. Scott

My Mum, Rocking Dog

My Mum

Niece Iona, Rocking Dog

Niece Iona